Wednesday, December 25, 2013

Happy Holidays 2013

I wish you a joyous holiday season and a happy new year!  These photos are of very special ornaments on the Museum's favorite Christmas tree--ornaments hand-painted by long-time volunteer, Tede Johnson.
I wish you peace.....
Lisa

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Eye See You 3

More guessing games!  This edition is about eyes...the first one is sort of a repeat if you've seen my other entries Eye See You and Eye See You Again, but I had an opportunity to get an excellent close up with my macro lens, so I couldn't resist:
This next one is from something that swims:
How about something soft and furry?
Do you know whose eye this is?
And our fine feathered friends have beautiful eyes as well!
Last one:
The first set of eyes, as I'm sure you've already figured out, are dragonfly eyes.  What's not to love about these amazing eyes?  First off, they give this fierce predator a tremendous field of view--almost 360 degree vision.  How cool is that!  And of course, I'm entranced by the shiny, iridescent quality of the eyes, in this case a brilliant blue. 
The fish's eye belongs to a porcupine fish.  The fishes on exhibit at the Museum are pretty used to watching people walk by, so I couldn't get a photo of the fish puffed up--which they can do if threatened:
The first furry animal was one of our coyotes...
...and the second is one of our does:
The first feathery critter is our beautiful red-tailed hawk, of course a bird of prey, and is one of our educational program animals.  A daytime (diurnal) hunter, red-tails prey upon soft furry things like squirrels, rabbits, and rodents:
The other feathery critter is a great horned owl, a nighttime (nocturnal) hunter, that can prey upon soft furry things like rodents, but interestingly enough can also hunt skunks.  Yuck, right?!  But not particularly so to great horned owls, which like most birds tend to have a poorly developed sense of smell; they instead rely more on their incredible senses of sight and hearing to help them hunt:
Many thanks to my friend and fellow "Nikonian" Karl Rebenstorf, a talented photographer, who happens to volunteer here at the Museum.  On the day I took this photo, he was exercising this owl, one of our educational program animals....That's all for now--more again in two weeks!
Cheers,
Lisa